Birth Story Of The Week – Jo and Betsy

In light of the Guardian’s story on hypnobirthing and it’s ever increasing popularity, today’s birth story from Jo describes how learning the techniques taught on her hypnobirthing course helped her overcome her fears from her previous traumatic birth, Tissues at the ready!

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My first daughter’s birth in 2012 didn’t exactly go to plan. I read all the books, did NCT, talked to friends and wrote my birth plan. Not once did I prepare for not being in control or for an emergency caesarean. I was left pretty shell shocked and it took me a while to get my shit together. I felt a bit like I had failed at the most important thing in my life. But I focused on the fact my beautiful daughter was fine and healthy. And I vowed never to do it again. Birth that is.

When I discovered I was pregnant again in May 2014 all the fears I’d stuffed to the back of my mind came back to life. I felt terrified and hated the thought of going through it all again. I spoke to my friend and midwife Clemmie at length about my worries. She knew how traumatic it had been first time round but right from our first conversation about it she said it would be different this time. I trusted her – she’s a wonder woman birth warrior, and my friend after all.
 
I knew I wanted to try for a VBAC (vaginal birth after caesarean). I had felt like I’d failed first time round, even though I’d gone through a long and hard labour resulting in caesarean, it somehow didn’t count as giving birth. Just because I didn’t push the baby out the usual way, I hadn’t done it ‘properly’. What does that say about the pressure on women surrounding birth?!
 
Clemmie suggested hypnobirthing and put us in contact with the lovely Hollie at London Hypnobirthing. We booked on to a course in October (my EDD was early January). I thought we’d probably be experiencing a few ‘and you’re back in the room’ moments but I was willing to give anything a shot. I spent the time busying myself with my stressful job and looking after a 2 and a half year old. I also fretted furiously about how the baby would fit into our family, and our house, and would I love it as much as my daughter? Was that possible? And all the other hormonal things that go round a pregnant woman’s head.
 
So October came and we started a loft conversion (wtf were we thinking?) and our hypnobirthing course. Right from the first session I felt differently. We learnt relaxation techniques and did breathing activities. We discussed birth in a safe and calm environment. There were only four couples and it felt very relaxed and intimate. My husband Tom was sold straight away, he took to it immediately. There was no hippy dippy stuff, just normal people looking to learn ways to relax and welcome their babies in a calm way without fear. We watched videos of births that were so calm the babies were born asleep! We did some work on releasing fear which helped the two of us talk honestly about the things we were worried about to do with the birth. Turned out our fears were identical. One of the fundamental things I took from the course was the belief that I had every right for my voice to be heard and that I could birth this baby the way I wanted.
 
Over the next few weeks I began to feel really quite excited about the birth and looked forward to meeting our baby. Something I never thought I’d do. One thing I wasn’t excited about was the endless builders coming and going from our house. Don’t do a loft conversion while you’re pregnant!
 
I was determined that our little girl had Christmas without the new baby stealing the show, plus Clemmie was going away for a couple of days so I told the baby to stay put and went about enjoying Christmas. I got quite emotional towards the end of my pregnancy and every day with my daughter felt significant. Our last days as a three. I’m ridiculously sentimental at the best of times but this was off the scale! It got to the point where Tom banned me from looking at baby pictures and videos of my daughter because I kept making myself cry…
 
I’d bought a soft doll to leave for my daughter if she woke up one morning and I wasn’t there (as in gone to have the baby…). I left it until the Saturday on the last weekend of the school holidays to wrap it up and wrote her an extremely soppy card (for someone to read to her). Tom said gloomily, “looks like I’m going back to work on Monday then” and we went to bed. I knew I was ready so the baby could come when it wanted.
 
At 4am I woke with mild period pain. This time round I completely and utterly trusted my instincts, I knew this was it. I put my relaxation mp3 on and closed my eyes. I must have gone back to sleep because at 6 I woke and realised the surges (hypnobirthing speak for contractions) had started. I woke Tom and told him to call his parents to come and get our daughter. Considering they were on high alert and live ten minutes away it seemed like it took them forever to get to us! My daughter woke up and I got her dressed, gave her a million hugs, packed her a bag and ended up opening her present with her. My hormones got the better of me and I was holding back some serious tears. When she left the house at 8 the surges instantly got a whole lot stronger.

I had a bath and Tom texted Clemmie. I think she got to us about 10am and at that point the surges were quite strong but I was breathing through them and feeling fine. I could feel adrenaline running through me and I was trying to stay relaxed. During Hypnobirthing we learnt about how adrenaline can slow labour or stop it altogether. I really didn’t want that to happen. Our second midwife arrived and was instantly warm and supportive.

When Clemmie examined me at 11am she said I was fully dilated! I couldn’t believe that I’d got to 10 without any difficulty. It gave me a massive massive boost. Tom and both midwives started gathering towels and bin bags and began to prep our bedroom for a birth. There was a bin bag underneath me and Tom was getting ready to catch our baby! Obviously not in the bin bag… I couldn’t believe I might even have a home birth! This would have exceeded our wildest expectations. As the surges intensified I started to push. All the while we were eating a lot of jelly babies (a good birth bag addition).
 
After a little while of pushing time seemed to stop, as did the contractions. So I was off the bed and walking around the house. Some of the things you can try if contractions stop are, walking, nipple tweaking, relaxing, laughing but nothing would get them going. And the longer they stopped the more anxious I became. Not because this had happened during my first birth, it hadn’t, but because I could feel myself getting more and more tense and frightened that things might not go to plan.
 
Eventually Clemmie and our other midwife said that it might be a good idea to go into hospital to be assessed to see if we could get some help getting contractions going again. FYI if you have had a previous caesarean a doctor will want to assess you before giving you Syntocinon due to risk of scar rupture.
 
So off we went in an ambulance (that I didn’t even know was outside), no blue lights but I felt pretty disheartened. Tom and our second midwife were trying to keep my spirits up but I tried to concentrate on the relaxation mp3 on my phone and drown out all the distractions. We got to hospital about 1.30pm I think. The room was ready and Clemmie was there and she did everything she could to carry on the vibe from home. I had to have a scan so the doctors could assess whether the baby was in a good enough position for a realistic chance at VBAC. To my delight the baby was perfectly positioned and we were given the go ahead for the drip. So, with feet in stirrups, foetal monitor on and a mouth full of jelly babies we waited for the drip to kick in. Not the most dignified time of my life but I was buzzing with the thought I’d meet my baby soon and I think the scan really helped to reassure me that all was ok. 
 
I began to get pretty tired and hungry and I think adrenaline was pumping. I got the shakes but then the contractions started coming pretty quickly. For some reason which we still don’t know, I couldn’t feel a single one. I’d had no pain relief but I had to be told when a contraction was coming by Clemmie looking at the monitor and saying ‘right, go for it!’ and I would push my heart out. At one point she had a stern word with me and told me to use my voice and any swear words I could think of to help push the baby out.  I felt like we were an amazing team, working together to help and guide me and birth this baby.

Because it was taking a while the doctor (in consultation with the midwives) decided that it might be a good idea to use a kiwi (kind of suction cup) on the babies head to help it down the last bit. Attaching this was possibly the most painful part of the whole labour but was over in minutes.

With two big pushes the baby’s head finally came out and that is when I knew we’d done it. The little body followed soon after and Clemmie very quickly instructed the doctor to stand back and let Tom discover the sex and then tell me it was a little girl! Then Tom got to cut the cord. I couldn’t believe it. We’d actually done it!!!!! And it was a girl too! I remember not quite believing what had happened. 
 
Our second amazing midwife had to swap with another amazing midwife and while paperwork was done and handover completed there was a little period of time I’ll never forget. This little person had come from me, I felt instantly connected, instantly knowing of her. She was mine! That is what I’d missed with my first birth. I’d felt so separate from the final event and the baby and Tom were taken out the room straight after the caesarean. Tom was so relieved everything was fine. He couldn’t quite believe it either!

Some wise woman found me a lasagne. It was honest to god the best thing I have ever eaten. Hospital lasagne.


I couldn’t thank Clemmie enough for her support. She and her colleagues had helped me achieve something I never thought I would. She said she’d come to me the next day and kissed me and my girl goodbye. 
 
The wonderful women got me ready to go to the ward. I was cleaned up and put in to my pjs and helped to the loo for my first wee. I just couldn’t stop smiling. I spoke to my mum on the phone and told her the beautiful baby girl snoozing on me had come out my vagina. My dad arrived with my sister, I told them this beautiful girl had come out my vagina. As I was wheeled to the ward, I told all the people in the lift that I’d just pushed this baby out my amazing vagina!! There was a lot of vagina praising going on. And then it was just the three of us in a cubicle, knowing that this little baby had always had a place in our family. We couldn’t wait for her to meet her amazing big sister. So Betsy Clementine met her big sister the following morning, and it was love at first sight.
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Birth Story Of The Week – Sarah and Quinn

OK, pregnancy number two. Baby number two. Birth number two. And I’m determined. Determined that second time around I will achieve the natural, drug-free water birth I so longed for.

My first son was breech, he got tangled up in his long long legs and just couldn’t flip himself around.  I tried an ECV turn procedure and every old wives tale in the book to try and turn him, but it was no good and he was born via “elective” c-section, a big baby at 9lbs.

I really didn’t want another c-section. I had found my experience to be quite cold, impersonal and clinical. Second time around I was incredibly lucky to have the wonderful Clemmie as my midwife. Together, at each stage of the pregnancy, we discussed how I would like my second birth to be and she helped me to fight for it. It turns out you need to fight quite hard to be allowed a waterbirth as a VBAC. The hospital wanted me to be continuously monitored in case of scar rupture, but I really wanted to use water as my pain relief, I know how much it relaxes me – even a bath at the end of a long day! But, everything was going smoothly with my pregnancy (after a cheeky low-lying placenta managed to move itself well out of the way of the exit!) so after a couple of different consultant appointments, and with huge support from my midwifery team, I was allowed to proceed with my wishes and aim for a natural water birth.

At my hospital, all women are given a third scan at 36 weeks. So, feeling heavy and hot I arrived with my husband with what should have been the final scan of the pregnancy, the last time we would see our baby on the inside before we finally got to meet them.

Everything seemed fine and the baby seemed healthy, but the sonographers started muttering to each other in that way that they do which makes your ears prick up and try to strain in to their conversation, was everything ok?! They asked a consultant sonographer to come and rescan me. They were concerned about baby’s size. Given my first son was 9lbs and both my husband and I are quite tall, we were never expecting a small baby, but at 36.5 weeks, this babe was already measuring at 8.5lbs. They told me I needed to return the next week for a follow up. Bad news. The next week’s scan showed even more dramatic growth and they expected a birth weight of over 10lbs. Now that’s a big baby. Too big unfortunately. Too big to deliver naturally when I had had a previous c-section. They were seriously worried about my scar rupturing and it didn’t help that I’d started getting shooting pains in the scar area. I was so disappointed as they signed me up for another c-section. I didn’t want that experience again. Firstly they suggested to book it in at 38 weeks but I was determined not to miss my best friend’s getting married which was happening that week, so I convinced them to book me in at 39 weeks. Obviously that meant I had a greater chance of going into labour naturally too which I was secretly glad about!

In the days that followed I spoke at length with Clemmie about how I might be able to improve my surgical experience this time around. We made a plan. My husband was tasked with making a playlist for surgery. First time around I had generic radio playing some awful songs and it was actually distracting. Rob compiled a CD for us of music that was both soothing and special to us. Clemmie was tasked with making sure I had proper skin-to-skin contact immediately post-birth, which I didn’t get first time and Rob wanted to cut the cord. She also put me in touch with Hollie from The Calm Birth School who bent over backwards to send me hypnobirthing books and MP3 affirmations. It had never even occurred to me that I could use these techniques to keep me calm, relaxed and focused even in a surgical environment.

So, I made it to 39 weeks, even raving it up on the dancefloor of our friend’s wedding until midnight 2 days before the c-section! I was feeling good and prepared, thanks to Clemmie and Hollie’s advice, to meet my baby at last!

I entered the hospital that day feeling calm and happy. We went through the motions of prepping for surgery and my midwife team and my husband did an amazing job of distracting me from any nerves.

The feeling of the surgery first time around had freaked me out, I’d expected to feel nothing, but although I was pain free, I could feel every detail of what was happening and I was scared. This time around, I used the hypnobirthing techniques to help me focus and keep calm. I knew I was doing the best thing for me and my baby and the most important thing was that he would arrive safely. Entering the theatre I was greeted by friendly, familiar faces and my music was playing. The first song was Cinematic Orchestra’s “Build a Home” which is our most special song. The clinical tools and machines in the room which had scared me first time around, just faded out as I just concentrated on my husband, the music and the excitement that we were about to meet our second child. I honestly forgot there was anyone else in the room.

Quinn was born moments later. He weighed in at 11lbs. Now THAT’s a big baby!

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The consultant had to wrestle him out of my pelvis as he had got well and truly wedged in. She immediately reassured me that I had made the right decision to have the c-section as he wouldn’t have delivered naturally. That was exactly the right thing to say to me. I felt relief and acceptance of the experience. Quinn was quickly taken away and Rob helped Clemmie cut the cord. He was bundled up and brought straight back to me for my first cuddle. The next 45 mins, the remainder of the operation, was spent in an intimate moment, just me, my husband and our boy. The room was still full of people, but Clemmie had helped to create an environment where we could just be together, happy tears, our music and skin-to-skin.

Sarah owns and runs Archie’s Boutique an online kids design and concept store. If you have little ones check it out but be warned you won’t leave with an empty basket.

Birth Story Of The Week – Maria, Mickey and Georgie

My first pregnancy was not exactly what I had hoped for – hyperemesis, followed by whooping cough, followed by hip pain, in between two house moves! Despite all this, my husband Michael and I were ecstatic and could not wait for our 1st baby to be born. We took photos of the bump every few weeks, read weekly about its development in the pregnancy book and were delighted to see the little creature on the ultrasound scans.

We went to the NHS antenatal classes and our plan was a hospital water birth with gas and air. I am an A&E doctor and Michael is a nurse, so the hospital is not a scary place! My mum would come over from Greece to help us with the last house move (at 36 weeks!), the birth and the new baby.

The baby was due on the 11th of June and 4 days after that I had what I thought was contractions.  I remember watching the football on TV (Euro 2012) and thinking “this is not bad, I have had period pains worse than this”. I was however quite frustrated that by the next morning they had gone and nothing was happening.  Two days later, on the Sunday, just as I had finished the chicken roast my husband had cooked for us, I felt a sensation I had never felt before and said to Michael and mum: “oh, this does hurt…I think it is starting”. I spent a few hours in the bath with mum timing the contractions while Michael was getting everything ready. We ended up going to hospital, which is a half an hour drive away, 4-5 hours later, at around 11pm, as the contractions grew closer and became quite strong.

When I arrived, I kept dropping down on all fours on the way to the ward, and when the midwife saw me she was positive I would have a quick labour. Unfortunately, I was only 3cm dilated, so went on to get in the bathtub in my room (the pools were both being occupied), still aiming for the “gas and air water birth” I had planned for. I was very happy that my mum had been allowed to stay with me during labour, as well as my husband. They were both very good and supportive in the many hours that followed, as I was moaning in the bath…Eventually, I gave in. I needed more pain killers. I came out of the water and had an injection of Pethidine. After that, it is all a bit vague. I remember pain, pushing and I remember the music list that Michael had made playing in the background (though I only remember 2 songs of the 7+ hours of music that was playing!). At a point Michael was sent out to get a snack as he had not eaten for hours. My mum and Michael were talking to me, though I cannot remember much of what they were saying. I thought I was sleeping a lot, but they later said to me that I was only asleep a few seconds at a time between contractions. I was dreamy and happy despite the pain.

When the midwives changed shifts in the morning I was still pushing but not getting anywhere. They broke my waters in an attempt to help, but still baby would not come. They could touch the head and they were suspicious that the baby had extended the neck instead of flexing it. After 2 more internal examinations that felt worse than the contractions it was decided that baby’s neck was indeed extended and therefore he or she was stuck. In the meantime, I was attached to the monitoring belts,  the baby’s heart was slowing to almost zero with every push and I was losing my contractions as I was so tired…suddenly my room filled with doctors and it was decided I would be taken to theatre for instrumental delivery or C-section. Everybody hustled around me, I was given various drugs, signed various forms and watched my poor mum, with her basic English and therefore basic understanding of what was happening, panicking inside. Then, they whizzed me off to the theatres at around 10.30am.

The spinal anaesthetic was the best thing ever and my pain was gone. I was not scared. I had spent a year of my training anaesthetising people and I was comfortable in the theatre environment. Michael was allowed in. They had 3 attempts at instrumental delivery and at 11.21am my beautiful baby boy was born via C-section, weighing 3.060 kilos (6lbs 12oz). We named him Michael Constantine as planned and we call him Mickey. Though he refused to take to the breast, much to my dismay and despite hours and hours of trying, he has grown into a beautiful boy. He just turned 2 on the 18th of June and he is absolutely lovely.

We had decided from the beginning that we would have our babies close together, but my 2nd positive test took us a bit by surprise. It was only a week after my little boy (then 8 months old) had come out of hospital after having meningitis, and only one month after starting to try to get pregnant. My second pregnancy was not different like everyone assured me.  It was simply worse. This time I even got admitted to hospital for IV rehydration. And the hip was a killer! I had to stop work a week earlier than planned as I could no longer really do my job properly.

The big question of this pregnancy was – elective C-section or an attempt at vaginal delivery? We pondered for weeks. I felt that I should attempt to have the 2nd baby naturally. After all, I was so close to delivering Mickey vaginally before, surely I could do it this time. On the other hand, the info given to me by my midwife said there was a 25% risk of another emergency section if I tried to give birth naturally. That was too high for me. My professional experience did not help either. I had seen how complicated emergency operations and anaesthetics could get and I did not want to end up with a general anaesthetic in the middle of the night. Though my personal experience with the emergency C-section for Mickey was excellent (I had very little pain post-operatively and it all went well from start to finish), I had a fear that it might not be as good this time. Thinking about the whole thing made me so stressed that I decided it was not worth it. I was not going to spend the rest of my pregnancy stressing about the potential of another emergency section. So, elective section it was. I had various appointments with my consultant and her team who discussed the pros and cons with me and accepted my decision. In fact, my consultant said that because I got so close with Mickey and was unable to deliver I was at an increased risk of needing a section again. So, I was relieved that I made that choice.

Georgia Eileen (Georgie) arrived 6 days before her due date, on the 7th of November 2013 at 11.08am weighing 3.27 kilos (7lbs 3oz). That morning, we took my suitcase, got into the car and drove to the hospital. I was a bit more stressed than when I went to hospital in labour. I think that was because there was not much adrenaline going around in my body and I had no contractions to concentrate on. We waited for our turn to go to theatre and then…there she was. She had a perfect fringe when they took her out of my belly, as if she had just been to the hairdresser. She took to the breast immediately at Recovery and is a happy, gorgeous little girl.

I guess what I am trying to put across is that I went into this pregnancy/birth world with a plan – a water birth with minimal drugs. I like a plan. I usually stick to my plans. But it did not happen. Both my births were very medical. But, at the end of the day that did not matter. They were still magical. Two beautiful babies made it into this world in good health and have been developing well since. Sometimes I think that if Mickey had been born in a time before C-sections he might not have made it out at all. I might not have made it. So, I am thankful for modern medicine.

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To Section or not to Section?

That really is the question.  And a very difficult question that a lot of women who have had a c-section with their first baby will face when having a subsequent baby.  I had a ‘normal’ delivery with my first baby so this was never an area I had to contemplate but a lot of my friends had emergency caesareans and found themselves debating what to do next time.  I know 2 people who have both been faced with this question, one opted for a VBAC (vaginal birth after caesarean, the other chose to have an elective section).  Here are their stories.

The birth of baby Clemmie.

Baby Clemmie moments after she was born

I was adamant from the start that I wanted to experience as natural and positive birth as I was able to with my second daughter. My first, Florence, had been born by emergency caesarean section once it was discovered that she was breech. All in all, my first birth was a stressful, disempowering experience which left me with severe baby blues and many regrets. As my husband and I only planned to have 2 children, this was my last chance as I saw it to experience what birth was all about.  I had booked back into my nearest hospital, Lewisham, for the birth and stayed with them up until my appointment (at around 25 weeks) with a consultant midwife with regards to my birth plans. I said that I wanted a VBAC and although she said that Lewisham supported these, she also just gave me a huge list of things I couldn’t do/ ways in which they would monitor/ induce and generally interfere with me as I was now an official ‘high risk’ birth.  I came out of the hospital feeling exactly as I did when I left a year and a half before after the birth of my first child. The meeting had been so negative and I realised that if I stayed with Lewisham then there was no chance of me having a positive birth – how could I if the care givers didn’t even believe in my abilities as a birthing mother, or support a non intrusive approach?  I looked into going to Kings College Hospital and was immediately heartened by their literature on VBAC on their website. In a few different places they said that they recommended certain procedures, however they did make it clear that it was a mother’s right to choose what she wanted to do.  When I went for my VBAC appointment with the consultant midwife there, things couldn’t be more different. I explained to her that I did not want to be continuously monitored during labour (as I had found that the knock on effect of this is for your midwife to concentrate on the machine and its readings as opposed to you when they come into the room – you become invisible!) and that I wanted a water birth. She was very supportive and I felt that my decision to change to Kings had been vindicated.  As my due date approached, I tried to stay active and positive. Having a small toddler certainly helped to keep me on my feet! I am a strong, physically capable woman and wanted to capitalise on that in the lead up to labour and the birth itself. I started to have quite strong twinges and Braxton Hicks from around 38 weeks and had an inkling that I might go into labour early.

On a Tuesday evening in July, the twinges finally settled down into regular and fairly strong contractions, around 3 every ten minutes. They were very bearable and I just concentrated on keeping as mobile and upright as I could throughout the night (unfortunately they were strong enough to keep me from sleeping that night!). I didn’t call the hospital as I instinctively knew that I was far from established labour but I did call my mother who on Wednesday started the journey down from Yorkshire so that she could look after my daughter. A friend arrived on Wednesday morning to take Florence for the day so I could concentrate on what was happening. As it turned out, my contractions slowed down to around 1 an hour that day, giving my husband and I the chance for last minute nesting/ cleaning/ bag packing etc! (Thank you mother nature!)

My mother arrived that evening once Florence was in bed, and once my subconscious knew that my daughter was in safe hands, my body started up labour again. Contractions became regular and painful fairly quickly, and by around midnight I decided to call the hospital. They asked me to come in just to check how everything was going (standard for a VBAC) and of course this slowed everything right down. We found out that had effaced but not dilated at all. I sometimes wonder at the relevance and usefulness of knowing about dilation as it can be quite dispiriting to find you are not as far as you thought!  We returned home and I decided not to go in again until I really felt ready. By this time I was using a TENS machine, and I set up a pacing routine in our living room. The pattern became contraction (where I would hold onto my husband) and then pacing up and down, up and down until the next one. This went on all night until I called the hospital again at about 7am on the Thursday morning, and they said I should come in. My subconscious perceived another change and slowed the contractions right down again immediately! (Really shows how feeling safe and secure is imperative for an uninterrupted labour and birth.) So we waited around another couple of hours until I felt like I was beginning to find the pain too intense to remain at home.

We arrived at hospital at around half 8 and found out I was 4cm dilated. By around 9 I was in my own lovely birthing pool room and I quickly started using gas and air which just took the edge of the contractions. I was still in the contracting/ pacing routing which really started things moving along fast. I had discussed my birth wishes with the midwife who had examined me on arrival and now had the go ahead for a water birth with no monitoring. The knowledge that this was happening as I had wished, along with being safely in our lovely room with our midwife who was very supportive, meant that my body decided to get on with things so to speak.  I was in the pool at around half 10 (I think – although my sense of time got rather hazy around this time!) and from that time until I gave birth to our little Clemmie at 12.22pm, things happened very quickly. The contractions became very intense, regular and close together and I was in survival mode really. I loved being in the water and with no clothes on and having taken off my glasses, I went very inward – I couldn’t really see anything and I don’t remember talking really either. I would cope with each contraction as it came and catch my breath in between. I was vaguely aware of my husband and my midwife talking sometimes in between but apart from that I was in my own birthing world. What was wonderful is that I wasn’t once examined or taken out of the pool, so I really was able to just be in my own world.  By around 12 my body started behaving strangely – and I felt the urge to be kneeling almost upright, bracing my body against the side of the bath and then – PUSH! What a strange feeling that was! I was aware of making quite a lot of noise, but there was nothing I could do about it, it just seemed the most natural thing to do. I knew I was suppose to stop pushing and ‘breathe’ my daughter out, but this didn’t exactly happen either as again, I just couldn’t stop my body pushing my baby out – I have never before felt the power of what my body is capable of and it still amazes me now to think about it.

And then, before I knew it, our little Clemmie was born.  What a feeling of relief although I was at first concerned about not dropping her into the water as by this time my poor legs had almost given out due to my contorted birth position.  It was a perfect birth and I wouldn’t change a thing about it.

Click here to read a fantastically written blog by a midwife, explaining all about VBAC.

Click here for more information in the UK about VBACs, your choices and all you need to know.